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Fed Days


The FOMC meeting is likely to bring in a widely anticipated 25-basis-point increase in the federal funds rate target. Market players will be more interested in the post-meeting statement. Will the word "measured" be deleted from the statement? That is the current expectation. However, it is probable that the change would still wreak havoc in the financial markets. In this case, what is expected may still not be fully digested.

Federal funds rate target Consensus Forecast for Mar 22 05: 2.75 percent (+0.25 percent)
In advance of next week's Federal Open Market Committee meeting on March 22, the Chicago Board of Trade will be reporting daily rate change probabilities in the FOMC's federal funds target rate, as indicated by the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract. The CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract is a key benchmark interest rate barometer that reflects the forward overnight effective rate for excess reserves that are traded among commercial banks in the U.S. federal funds market.

Based upon the March 18 market close, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract for the April 2005 expiration is currently pricing in a 100 percent probability that the FOMC will increase the target rate by at least 25 basis points from 2-1/2 percent to 2-3/4 percent at the FOMC meeting on March 22.

In addition, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract is pricing in an 8 percent probability of a further 25-basis point increase in the target rate to 3 percent (versus a 92 percent probability of just a 25-basis point rate increase).

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Tomorrow is an FOMC interest rate announcement day. To see charts from previous Fed Days and how the market reacts click here Fed Day Charts

To discuss this day type please reply to this topic.
Press Release
Release Date: May 3, 2005

For immediate release

(Note: Corrects previous release to add sentence in second paragraph, which was dropped inadvertently.)

The Federal Open Market Committee decided today to raise its target for the federal funds rate by 25 basis points to 3 percent.

The Committee believes that, even after this action, the stance of monetary policy remains accommodative and, coupled with robust underlying growth in productivity, is providing ongoing support to economic activity. Recent data suggest that the solid pace of spending growth has slowed somewhat, partly in response to the earlier increases in energy prices. Labor market conditions, however, apparently continue to improve gradually. Pressures on inflation have picked up in recent months and pricing power is more evident. Longer-term inflation expectations remain well contained.

The Committee perceives that, with appropriate monetary policy action, the upside and downside risks to the attainment of both sustainable growth and price stability should be kept roughly equal. With underlying inflation expected to be contained, the Committee believes that policy accommodation can be removed at a pace that is likely to be measured. Nonetheless, the Committee will respond to changes in economic prospects as needed to fulfill its obligation to maintain price stability.

Voting for the FOMC monetary policy action were: Alan Greenspan, Chairman; Timothy F. Geithner, Vice Chairman; Susan S. Bies; Roger W. Ferguson, Jr.; Richard W. Fisher; Edward M. Gramlich; Donald L. Kohn; Michael H. Moskow; Mark W. Olson; Anthony M. Santomero; and Gary H. Stern.

In a related action, the Board of Governors unanimously approved a 25-basis-point increase in the discount rate to 4 percent. In taking this action, the Board approved the requests submitted by the Boards of Directors of the Federal Reserve Banks of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Richmond, Atlanta, Chicago, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Dallas, and San Francisco.
Based upon the June 24 market close, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract for the July 2005 expiration is currently pricing in a 100 percent probability that the FOMC will increase the target rate by at least 25 basis points from 3 percent to 3-1/4 percent at the FOMC meeting on June 30.

In addition, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract is pricing in a 4 percent probability of a further 25-basis point increase in the target rate to 3-1/2 percent (versus a 96 percent probability of just a 25-basis point rate increase).
CBOT Trader Newsletter: August 8, 2005

CBOT® Fed Watch


Based upon the August 8 market close, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract for the August 2005 expiration is currently pricing in a 100 percent probability that the FOMC will increase the target rate by at least 25 basis points from 3-1/4 percent to 3-1/2 percent at the FOMC meeting on August 9.

In addition, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract is pricing in a 9 percent probability of a further 25-basis point increase in the target rate to 3-3/4 percent (versus a 91 percent probability of just a 25-basis point rate increase).
Fed Watch - 94% Probability FOMC Will Increase Target Rate on Sept. 20

In advance of next week's Federal Open Market Committee meeting on September 20, the Chicago Board of Trade will be reporting daily rate change probabilities in the FOMC's federal funds target rate, as indicated by the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract. The CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract is a key benchmark interest rate barometer that reflects the forward overnight effective rate for excess reserves that are traded among commercial banks in the U.S. federal funds market.

Based upon the September 16 market close, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract for the October 2005 expiration is currently pricing in a 94 percent probability that the FOMC will increase the target rate by at least 25 basis points from 3-1/2 percent to 3-3/4 percent at the FOMC meeting on September 20 (versus a 6 percent probability of no rate change).

CBOT Fed Watch - October 28 Market Close

In advance of next week's Federal Open Market Committee meeting on November 1, the Chicago Board of Trade will be reporting daily rate change probabilities in the FOMC's federal funds target rate, as indicated by the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract. The CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract is a key benchmark interest rate barometer that reflects the forward overnight effective rate for excess reserves that are traded among commercial banks in the U.S. federal funds market.

Based upon the October 28 market close, the CBOT 30-Day Federal Funds futures contract for the November 2005 expiration is currently pricing in a 98 percent probability that the FOMC will increase the target rate by at least 25 basis points from 3-3/4 percent to 4 percent at the FOMC meeting on November 1 (versus a 2 percent probability of no rate change).


Summary Table
October 25: 0% for No Change versus 100% for +25 bps.
October 26: 2% for No Change versus 98% for +25 bps.
October 27: 2% for No Change versus 98% for +25 bps.
October 28: 2% for No Change versus 98% for +25 bps.
October 31:
November 1: FOMC decision on federal funds target rate.
Reminder: Tomorrow is Fed Day. Expect volatility from 2:15pm onwards.
The Federal Open Market Committee decided today to raise its target for the federal funds rate by 25 basis points to 4-1/4 percent.

Despite elevated energy prices and hurricane-related disruptions, the expansion in economic activity appears solid. Core inflation has stayed relatively low in recent months and longer-term inflation expectations remain contained. Nevertheless, possible increases in resource utilization as well as elevated energy prices have the potential to add to inflation pressures.

The Committee judges that some further measured policy firming is likely to be needed to keep the risks to the attainment of both sustainable economic growth and price stability roughly in balance. In any event, the Committee will respond to changes in economic prospects as needed to foster these objectives.
The markets remain on edge as we await an anticipated 1/4 point hike in rates tomorrow in order to curb inflation. The markets are questioning where we are going in the next 6 months and when the rate hikes will stop.