Lisbon Treaty: History, Impact and Opinions

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Definition of 'Lisbon Treaty: History, Impact and Opinions'

The Lisbon Treaty is an international treaty that was signed on 13 December 2007, and entered into force on 1 December 2009. It amends the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), which together make up the primary law of the European Union (EU). The treaty was originally intended to be signed in Lisbon, Portugal, but was instead signed in the Portuguese city of √Čvora.

The Lisbon Treaty was the result of a lengthy and difficult negotiation process. It was originally intended to be signed in 2004, but was delayed due to disagreements between member states on a number of issues, including the size of the European Parliament, the voting system for the European Council, and the powers of the European Commission.

The Lisbon Treaty was finally signed in 2007, but it did not come into force until 2009. This was because a number of member states had to hold referendums on the treaty, and some of these referendums were not successful. The Irish referendum on the treaty was held in 2008, and it was rejected by voters. A second referendum was held in 2009, and this time the treaty was approved.

The Lisbon Treaty has a number of significant implications for the EU. It increases the powers of the European Parliament, and it makes it easier for the EU to take action on a number of issues, such as climate change and immigration. The treaty also establishes a new permanent president of the European Council, and it creates a new European External Action Service.

The Lisbon Treaty has been controversial since its inception. Some people believe that it has given too much power to the EU, while others believe that it has not gone far enough in reforming the EU. The treaty has also been criticized for being too complex and difficult to understand.

Despite the controversy, the Lisbon Treaty is now an integral part of the EU legal framework. It has had a significant impact on the way the EU works, and it is likely to continue to have a major impact in the years to come.

Here are some of the key impacts of the Lisbon Treaty:

* It has increased the powers of the European Parliament. The Parliament now has a greater role in the legislative process, and it has more power to oversee the work of the European Commission.
* It has made it easier for the EU to take action on a number of issues. The treaty has created new procedures for decision-making, and it has made it easier for the EU to adopt legislation on a range of issues, such as climate change and immigration.
* It has established a new permanent president of the European Council. The president of the European Council is responsible for chairing the meetings of the European Council, and he or she represents the EU on the international stage.
* It has created a new European External Action Service. The European External Action Service is responsible for conducting the EU's foreign policy.

The Lisbon Treaty has been a controversial treaty since its inception. Some people believe that it has given too much power to the EU, while others believe that it has not gone far enough in reforming the EU. The treaty has also been criticized for being too complex and difficult to understand.

Despite the controversy, the Lisbon Treaty is now an integral part of the EU legal framework. It has had a significant impact on the way the EU works, and it is likely to continue to have a major impact in the years to come.

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